Books

Proceedings of S-BPM ONE 2015
Jens Ehlers, Bernhard Thalheim (Eds.)

Proceedings of the International Conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management held in 2015 at the Wirtschaftsakademie Schleswig-Holstein in Kiel, Germany. The S-BPM ONE 2015 is the 7th edition of the conference series and focuses on process innovation, particularly based on S-BPM application scenarios.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM in the Wild
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-319-17541-6

This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

S-BPM Illustrated
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Raß, Robert Singer
ISBN: 978-3642369032

This book shows how subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM) and its tools can be used in order to solve communication and synchronization problems of humans and/or machines in an organization.

S-BPM ONE - Running Processes
Herbert Fischer, Josef Schneeberger (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3-642-36753-3

This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management, S-BPM ONE 2013, held in Deggendorf, Germany, in March 2013. The papers are organized in topical sections on running concepts; running business process management types; running applications; running ideas; running solutions; running projects.

Subject-oriented Business Process Management
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary, Stefan Obermeier, Egon Börger
ISBN: 978-3642323911
  • Novel BPM methodology focusing on process actors and their interactions
  • Exploitation of natural language semantics to increase stakeholder acceptance and process quality
  • Inclusion of many examples, checklists, tips for hands-on experience
  • Additional web site provides software and further material

On the basis of this book the Johannes Kepler university Linz is presenting a German e-learning platform for S-BPM (guest user: i2pm / password: i2pm).

S-BPM ONE - Scientifc Research
Christian Stary (Ed.)
ISBN: 978-3642291326

This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed scientific proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management, S-BPM ONE 2012, held in Vienna, Austria, in April 2012. The 12 papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 36 submissions and are completed by one invited keynote paper and a summary of the tutorial on subject-oriented business process management. S-BPM as a discipline is characterized by a seamless approach toward the analysis, modeling, implementation, execution, and maintenance of business processes, with an explicit stakeholder focus. This year's contributions address all life-cycle activities, in particular analyzing business objectives, subject behavior design and integration, and automating complex work procedures.

S-BPM ONE - Education and Industrial Developments
Stefan Oppl, Albert Fleischmann (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3642292934

This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed proceedings of the industrial track of the 4th International Conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management, S-BPM ONE 2012, held in Vienna, Austria, in April 2012. S-BPM as a discipline is characterized by a seamless approach toward the analysis, modeling, implementation, execution, and maintenance of business processes, with an explicit stakeholder focus. The 19 papers included were selected from the practically oriented submissions, and they have gone through the same rigorous peer-review process as their scientific counterparts.

S-BPM ONE - Learning by Doing - Doing by Learning
Werner Schmidt (Ed.)
ISBN: 978-3642234705

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the conference S-BPM ONE 2011, held at the university of applied science (HAW) in Ingolstadt.

In this book you can find many contributions from research: Universities from Braunschweig, Deggendorf, Darmstadt, Linz, Köln, Moskau and Nürnberg-Erlangen have been summarized their research findings around (S-)BPM. Also the practice had their opportunity to speak: Companies such as Audi, Achat Solutions, BIK, ByElement, Deutsche Telekom, Infomedia Services, NEC Corporation, Siemens and RBA Technologies are describing their experiences with (S-)BPM.

Subject-Oriented Business Process Management
Albert Fleischmann, Werner Schmidt, Robert Singer, Detlef Seese (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3642231346

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the english speaking conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management, S-BPM ONE 2010, held at the university in Karlsruhe, Germany.

It includes contributions of Acando, Metasonic and universities in Bern, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Graz, Koblenz, Moskau, Stuttgart and TU Darmstadt.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

Whom to talk to?
Albert Fleischmann, Christian Stary

Although many organizations operate in a process-driven way, few members are skilled in specifying and developing business processes - a skill that has become crucial for organization development, in particular to establish agile enterprises.

This paper, published in the International Journal "Universal Access in the Information Society", shows on the basis of natural language constructs (subject, predicate, object) and communication patterns between actors (subjects), how individual members of an organization could contribute to coherent and intelligible process specifications. A language and tool supporting Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are introduced, allowing organizations to cope with strategic and operational challenges dynamically. As many organizations already work with BPM concepts and technologies, existing approaches to process modelling are also revisited with respect to representing natural language constructs and standard sentence syntax. Since most of them refer either to subjects, predicates, objects or to a respective combination, a roadmap can be developed for enriching existing modelling approaches. In doing so, organizations can benefit from stakeholder inputs for effective business process engineering re-using existing specifications.

S-BPM ONE - Setting the Stage for S-BPM
Hagen Buchwald, Albert Fleischmann, Detlef Seese, Christian Stary (Eds.)
ISBN: 978-3642159145

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First Workshop on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management, S-BPM ONE 2009, held in Karlsruhe, Germany, in October 2009.